Charles Martin Stanley II (HESA) received first place for his exploration of Racial Identity and the Academic Success of Black Males at Historically and Predominantly White Institutions.

Charles Martin-Stanley II (middle), a doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) program, received first place in the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research Symposium, for the second year in a row, for his exploration of Racial Identity and the Academic Success of Black Males at Historically and Predominantly White Institutions. With him are College of Education Emeritus Dean, Nicholas Colangelo and Kay Colangelo, who sponsored the awards presentation.

| January 25, 2019

Almost 20 graduate students in the University of Iowa College of Education showcased their research on topics relating to diversity in education during the 2019 Martin Luther King, Jr. Research Symposium.

The symposium, which took place Friday, Jan 26, covered topics ranging from

“Sense of Belonging at a PWI: A Phenomenological Study of Graduate International Students from Iran” to “Interviews with Black, Female Pre-Service Teachers.” 

Nicole Amato (Language, Literacy & Culture) received second place for her Hungry for Responsible Representation of the Fat Female Body in Young Adult Literature.

The event was sponsored by the College of Education Diversity Committee, and the awards were sponsored by Dean Emeritus Nicholas Colangelo and Kay Colangelo. The symposium took place in the Professional Development Area of the Baker Teacher Leader Center in the UI College of Education.

Additional sponsors include the following: UI Chief Diversity Office, the Office of Graduate Inclusion with special thanks to Diana Sproles, Joe Henry, and Natalie Brown, and the Tippie Undergraduate Program Office with special thanks to Gabriela Rivera. 

Charles Martin Stanley II (Higher Education and Student Affairs) received first place for his exploration of "Racial Identity and the Academic Success of Black Males at Historically and Predominantly White Institutions."

Krista Walker (Schools, Culture & Society) received third place for her study of Unearthing the Existence of the Black LGB Individuals in Educational History.

Nicole Amato (upper right image)(Language, Literacy and Culture) received second place for her research project, “Hungry for Responsible Representation of the Fat Female Body in Young Adult Literature.” 

Krista Walker (image to the right) (Schools, Culture and Society) received third place for her study of "Unearthing the Existence of the Black LGB Individuals in Educational History."

Leslie Locke, assistant professor in Educational Policy and Leadership Studies

welcomed everyone to the symposium.

Menah Pratt-Clarke, vice president of strategic affairs and diversity and professor of education at Virginia Tech, gave the keynote address on “Advancing the Vision: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Black Women.”

“Many black females protested to open the doors for the current generation,” Pratt-Clarke says. “To create a world imagined and envisioned of Martin Luther King, Jr., we must not underestimate the power of voice in leadership. Much of Martin Luther King, Jr’s. power was in his words,” she says.” I believe we must refuse to be silenced, voice our concerns and become more courageous.”

Learn more about the research of other student presenters during the symposium.