Director

Nick Bowman is the Mary Louise Petersen Chair in Higher Education, professor of higher education and student affairs, and senior research fellow in the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa. He received a Ph.D. in psychology and education as well as two master’s degrees in education from the University of Michigan; he also graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. His research uses a social psychological lens to explore key topics in higher education, including student success, diversity and equity, undergraduate admissions, rankings, and quantitative research methodology. His work has appeared in nearly 100 peer-reviewed journal articles in outlets such as Review of Educational Research, Educational Researcher, Sociology of Education, Social Psychological and Personality Science, and Science Advances. He is a co-author of How College Affects Students (Volume 3), which synthesized over 1,800 studies on the impact of college.

Emeritus Director

Ernie Pascarella is Professor Emeritus and the former Mary Louise Petersen Endowed Chair in Higher Education at the University of Iowa. His research focuses on the impact of college on students, and he is co-author of the 1991 and 2005 books: How College Affects Students (Vols. 1 and 2). He has received the research awards of such national organizations as the Association for Institutional Research, American Educational Research Association (Division-J), Association for the Study of Higher Education, American College Personnel Association, National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, and Council of Independent Colleges. In 1990, he served as president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education and received that association’s Howard R. Bowen Distinguished Career Award in 2003. His recent publications in affiliation with the work of CRUE appear in such outlets as Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Higher Education, and Journal of College Student Development.

Faculty Associates

Brian An is Associate Professor of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies at the University of Iowa. He attained a Ph.D. and M.S. in sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research broadly focuses on sociology of education, educational stratification, college choice, college persistence, and degree attainment. More specifically, his research focuses on a sociological tradition that combines the study of educational transitions (e.g., the transition from high school to college) and students’ participation in the stratified curriculum (e.g., high school tracking). His work has appeared in Educational Evaluation and Policy AnalysisSocial Science ResearchJournal of Higher Education, Research in Higher EducationJournal of College Student Development, and other top outlets.

Cassie L. Barnhardt is Associate Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs at the University of Iowa. She holds her Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Michigan, a Master’s in Student Affairs from Michigan State University, and two bachelor’s degrees also from the University of Michigan. Cassie’s research focuses on various aspects of civic and public engagement including how college students learn about and enact social responsibility, and how universities, as organizations, contribute to democracy and civic life. Cassie has published in Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Journal of College Student DevelopmentReview of Higher Education, among others. Some of her work has been pursued with financial support from the John Templeton Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Cassie teaches graduate courses on the administration of student affairs, organizational behavior and management in postsecondary institutions, and research methods.

Katharine Broton is Assistant Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs at the University of Iowa. She attained a Ph.D. and M.S. in Sociology and a B.S. in Sociology and Afro American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her research broadly focuses on sociology of education, social stratification, and education policy. She uses multiple methods to examine the role of poverty and inequality in higher education as well as policies and programs designed to minimize related disparities and promote college success. Her work has appeared in Educational Researcher, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, The New York Times, and Wisconsin Public Television, among others. The National Science Foundation, Kresge Foundation, Lumina Foundation, and others have supported her research. She teaches graduate courses on research methods, finance in higher education, and higher education policy.

Jodi L. Linley is Associate Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs at the University of Iowa. She holds her Ph.D. in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education from Michigan State University, a MA degree in Student Development from the University of Iowa, and a bachelor’s degree in English also from the University of Iowa. Jodi’s research broadly focuses on minoritized collegians’ experiences and supports. More specifically, Jodi studies college student meaning-making about campus culture and campus diversity messaging; minoritized college student success; and higher education socialization. She is PI of multiple research studies focused on LGBTQ+ college student success. Jodi has published in the Journal of College Student Development, Journal of Student Affairs Research & Practice, College Teaching, Whiteness & Education, NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, New Directions for Student Services, among others. Jodi teaches graduate courses on college students and their development, teaching and learning in higher education, and advanced.

Michael B. Paulsen is Professor Emeritus of Higher Education and Student Affairs at the University of Iowa. He received his Ph.D. in higher education/economics from the University of Iowa, MA in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and BA in economics/sociology from St. Ambrose University. His research focuses on teaching, learning & curriculum; economics/finance, student choice, persistence & success. He is Series Editor of Higher Education: Handbook of Theory & Research. He has published several books: College Choice; Taking Teaching Seriously and Teaching & Learning in the College Classroom (w/K. Feldman); Finance of Higher Education (w/J. Smart); Economics of Higher Education and Applying Economics to IR (w/R. Toutkoushian). His research has appeared in journals such as Research in Higher Education, Journal of Higher Education, Review of Higher Education, Journal of College Student Development, Higher Education,Economics of Education Review, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. He received the ASHE Research Achievement Award in 2015.

Carly Armour
carly-armour@uiowa.edu

Carly Armour is a third-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program. Her research interests include the college experiences and outcomes of students with disabilities with multiple marginalized identities and the effects of higher education organizations and policies on these students. She also studies the experiences and systematic barriers that international students with disabilities encounter while studying abroad.

Solomon Fenton-Miller
solomon-fenton-miller@uiowa.edu

Solomon Fenton-Miller is first-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program. His interests include learning analytics, online learning, and the use of technology in the classroom.

Molly Hall-Martin
molly-hall-martin@uiowa.edu

Molly Hall-Martin is a third-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program. Her research focuses higher education policy and its impacts on student access and outcomes especially as it relates to Indigenous students. She also studies the policies and politics surrounding Confucius Institutes, higher education governance, governing boards, and state agencies.

Lauren Irwin
lauren-irwin@uiowa.edu

Lauren Irwin is a doctoral in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program. Her research uses critical theories of whiteness and legitimation to examine and disrupt racial inequities in co-curricular programs, like leadership education.

Nayoung Jang
nayoung-jang@uiowa.edu

Nayoung Jang is a doctoral candidate in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program. Her research interests include college student development and experiences focusing on psychosocial development and spirituality as well as the impact of globalization on higher education.

Lindsay Jarratt
lindsay-jarratt@uiowa.edu

Lindsay Jarratt is in her fifth year of doctoral studies in the Schools, Culture, and Society program at the University of Iowa. Her research interests focus on the role educational systems play in the production and maintenance of social dominance, implicit and explicit negotiation of power and ownership in learning ecologies, and capacities of education to resist or transform systems of oppression.

Shinji Katsumoto
shinji-katsumoto@uiowa.edu

Shinji Katsumoto is a third-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Ph.D. program and a graduate researcher at CRUE. His research focuses on student success and world university rankings in the international education context. His recent studies examine how college experiences of international students in the United States influence their psychological and academic outcomes.

Jeff Ching-Fan Lai
ching-fan-lai@uiowa.edu

Jeff Ching-Fan Lai is a second-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program at the University of Iowa. His research interests include civic responsibilities of colleges, students' democratic understanding, and community engagement.

Alex C. Lange
alex-lange@uiowa.edu

Alex C. Lange is a doctoral candidate in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program at the University of Iowa. Alex’s research examines both those on the margins in higher education along axes of sexuality, race, and gender as well as the forces that pushes those communities to the margins, including whiteness/white supremacy, heterosexism, and trans-antagonism. Their dissertation reports on results from the first two years of a longitudinal study attempting to understand transgender colleges journeys through undergraduate education.

Gordon Louie
gordon-louie@uiowa.edu

Gordon Louie is a fourth-year in the Higher Education and Student Affairs doctoral program. His research interests are on campus internationalization efforts in the U.S., skills and practices for navigating difficult dialogues, and gamification as well as gaming environments broadly in higher education. 

Milad Mohebali
milad-mohebali@uiowa.edu

Milad Mohebali is a doctoral candidate in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program at the University of Iowa. His research focuses largely on the (geo)politics of knowledge and the sociology of higher education by exploring the intersections of science, university, and modernity/coloniality. He is also active in research on addressing food insecurity in college, campus mobilization, and facilitation of difficult dialogues.

Nicholas Stroup
nicholas-stroup@uiowa.edu

Nicholas Stroup is a third-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program and a graduate researcher for CRUE. His research interests include graduate and professional education, global contexts of higher education, and theories of socialization. He currently serves as the graduate student representative to the University of Iowa Research Council.

Nikki Tennessen
nicole-tennessen@uiowa.edu

Nikki Tennessen is a first-year doctoral student in the Higher Education and Student Affairs program. Her research interests include the roles of student motivation and expectations on student success as well as how institutions use assessment data to inform decision-making.