November 9-11, 2017,
Houston, TX

Conference website.

College of Education presentations (HESA)

Thursday, November 9

Aren't They All the Same? Positioning Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the Organizational Field of Higher Education
12:45-2:00pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Meyerland B 
This study uses institutional reference-groups to examine (1) how postsecondary institutions classify Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and (2) whether institutions accept HBCUs’ organizational identity claims. Findings indicate that others largely do not incorporate HBCUs in the field and do not affirm HBCUs’ identity claims. We then discuss implications. 
Graham Miller, University of Iowa
Freda Lynn, University of Iowa
Laila McCloud, University of Iowa

Differing Approaches to College Student Engagement 
12:45-2:00pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Hunter's Creek B
Discussant: Nick Bowman, University of Iowa

Improving College Access at Low-Income High Schools? The Impact of the GEAR UP Program on Postsecondary Enrollment and Persistence
2:15-3:30pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Kingwood A 
Surprisingly little research has examined the effects of the federal GEAR UP initiative on college outcomes. In this study, multilevel difference-in-differences analyses indicate that GEAR UP promotes college enrollment (cutting the gap between lower-income and higher-income high schools by about half), whereas it has no impact on college persistence. 
Nick Bowman, University of Iowa
Sanga Kim, University of Iowa
Laura Ingleby, Iowa College Student Aid Commission
David Ford, Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency
Christina Sibouih, Iowa College Aid

Friday, November 10

Roundtable 7: Sweat it Out: The Benefits of Exercise on Students' Psychological Wellbeing
8:00 to 8:45am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Fourth, Salon FGH
This study examines the influence of students’ exercise habits on several measures of emotional health in their fourth year of college. Using a multi-institutional, longitudinal dataset to examine wellbeing using both hierarchical modelling and augmented inverse propensity weighted regression, this study has implications for students, college administrators, and quantitative researchers.
Joshua Holmes, University of Iowa
KC Culver, University of Iowa
Ernie Pascarella, University of Iowa

Roundtable 8: Challenging Critical Thinking: A Measure of Critical Being in an Era of Accountability
8:00 to 8:45am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Fourth, Salon FGH
This study challenges prevailing views of critical thinking by operationalizing Davies (2015) theoretical notion of critical being and developing a new measure to assess this construct. The measurement development strategy is articulated and results of confirmatory factor analyses are provided. Finally, conceptual and empirical implications of this study are discussed.
KC Culver, University of Iowa
Benjamin S. Selznick, James Madison University
Teniell L. Trolian, University at Albany, State University of New York

Roundtable 9: I didn’t become a professor to teach high school: Examining college educators’ perspectives of culture in Early College High Schools
8:00 to 8:45am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Fourth, Salon FGH
This exploratory qualitative study examines how college educators affiliated with Early College High Schools perceive the culture. Findings illustrate patterns of norms, values, practices, beliefs, and assumptions that contribute to how these educators experience culture through their affiliation in these unique educational contexts.
Amanda L. Mollet, University of Iowa
Matthew Stier, University of Iowa
Jodi L. Linley, University of Iowa
Leslie Ann Locke, University of Iowa

Roundtable 20: The role of Sister Circles in African American women doctoral student success
8:00 to 8:45am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Fourth, Salon FGH
There is a significant gap between the number of African American women who pursue graduate education and pursue roles within academia. The purpose of this roundtable is to encourage a dialogue about the impact of gendered racism on diversifying the professional pipeline.
Shamika Nicole Karikari, Miami University
Laila McCloud, University of Iowa
Brittany M. Williams, University of Georgia
DaVida L. Anderson, University of Iowa
Shetina M. Jones, --

Identity-based Campus Centers as Power(full) Places? Prospects for Liberatory Praxis 
10:15-11:30am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, River Oaks A 
This symposium will be centered on exploring the impact of identity-based campus centers’ work, the prospects for centers’ engagement with critical institutional transformation, and the ways in which such centers do or do not live up to their professed aims of enacting liberatory praxis for minoritized individuals and communities. 
Dafina-Lazarus Stewart, Colorado State University
Lori Patton Davis, Indiana University
Alex C. Lange, University of Iowa
Adele Lozaon, University of Wisconsin – La Crosse

Power to the Schoolteachers: Summer Sessions at U.S. Colleges and Universities, 1890s-1930s
10:15-11:30am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Sugarland A 
Summer education for schoolteachers helped shape the wider history of higher education between the 1890s and 1930s. Summer programs were important in the marketing and growth of institutions, the expansion of access, and higher education’s service to public education and the common good. 
Christine A. Ogren, University of Iowa

The Power of Integration: Undergraduate Experiences that Promote Connections and Translations Beyond College
11:45-1:00pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Sugarland A
In this paper, we analyze data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education (WNS), a longitudinal multicampus study of undergraduate students attending 47 U.S. campuses. We found several key college experiences, including diversity courses and leadership training, had positive effects on students’ integration of learning over a four-year span. 
James P. Barber, College of William and Mary
Cassie L. Barnhardt, University of Iowa
Ryan L. Young, University of Iowa

A Report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: The Role of Assessment of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Competencies in Supporting Students' College Success 
1:15-2:30pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Fourth, Salon H
Discussant: Debora Liddell, University of Iowa

The Effects of Employment on Academic Progress: A Propensity Score Analysis with Non-binary Groups
2:45 to 4:30pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third Floor, Salon Prefunction
We used propensity score matching with non-binary treatments to examine the effects of employment. Students working more than 20 hours per week, on average, earner fewer graded semester hours and had lower term GPAs than matched peers who did not work or who worked up to 20 hours a week.
Patrick Rossmann, University of Iowa
Matthew Anson, University of Iowa
Sam Van Horne, University of Iowa

Exploring LGBTQ+ College Students Meaning-Making of Current Activism and Sociohistorical Movements
2:45-4:00pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Montrose B 
Using data from a longitudinal qualitative study of LGBTQ+ student success, authors sought to examine how students make meaning of social change across time and understand what connections, if any, students made between these issues. This study seeks to complicate theories of moral, ethical, and cognitive development and reasoning. 
Alex C. Lange, University of Iowa
Heather D. Shea, Michigan State University
William Alexander, Michigan State University
Kristen Renn, Michigan State University
Michael Woodford, University of Michigan

"A Student Should Have the Privilege of Just Being a Student": Student Activism as Labor
2:45-4:00pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Montrose B 
On college campuses, minoritized students are engaged in activism. As students work to transform their campuses, they do so at a cost, one of which is the unpaid labor they provide their institutions. In this paper, we explore this labor among student activists, as well as other consequences of activism. 
Stephen John Quaye, Miami University
Chris Linder, University of Georgia
Alex C. Lange, University of Iowa
Wilson K Okello, --
Marvette Lacy, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Understanding and Improving IPEDS Data Collection on High School Students Taking College Courses
2:45 to 4:30pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third Floor, Salon Prefunction
The number of high school students taking college courses has expanded dramatically over the past decade, and IPEDS data collection does not accurately capture this increase. This study reports results from an NCES/NPEC study and paper intended to provide recommendations to improve IPEDS data collection.
Jason Taylor, University of Utah
Brian P. An, University of Iowa

University of Iowa reception
5:30-7:00pm, Massa’s South Coast Grill
The Shops at Houston Center, 1331 Lamar St #114
Houston, TX 77010

Saturday, November 11

I Think for Myself, Therefore I Am: Self-Authorship Capacity and College Student Experiences and Outcomes
10:30-11:45am, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Meyerland A 
This mixed-method study examined the relationship between college students’ self-authorship capacity and their subsequent experiences and outcomes. Findings from 214 participants suggest self-authorship capacity at the beginning of the first year is positively and significantly associated with three sets of college experiences, which then predict improved outcomes. 
Nick Bowman, University of Iowa
Jodi L. Linley, University of Iowa
Kari Weaver, University of Iowa

Exploring and Centering the Voices of LGBTQ+ College Students 
12:00-1:15pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Hunter's Creek B 
Discussant: Jodi L. Linley, University of Iowa

Queer in Residence: Exploring the On-Campus Housing Experiences of Queer College Students
1:30-2:45pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Montrose A 
Despite evidence that living on campus positively affects students, queer students experience microaggressions and macro-aggressive behaviors that may diminish those positive effects. This longitudinal, qualitative study examined the narratives of 12 queer college students and their experiences living on campus toward understanding the ways queer college students navigate their required on-campus housing experiences. Findings delineate the ways participants’ on-campus housing experiences are influenced by situation, self, supports, and strategies (Schlossberg, 2008). Implications for student affairs practice and policy are discussed. 
Jodi L. Linley, University of Iowa
Amanda L. Mollet, University of Iowa
Liza Hurley, University of Iowa
Kari Weaver, University of Iowa
Joshua Holmes, University of Iowa
Kristen Renn, Michigan State University

Show Up!: Relationships between Campus Administrators and Student Activists
1:30-2:45pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Briargrove A 
The purpose of this paper is to examine relationships between student activists and administrators and educators on college campuses. Through interviews with 27 student activists and 13 campus educators/administrators, we examined the barriers student perceived from campus administrators and the support they received from educators. 
Chris Linder, University of Georgia
Stephen John Quaye, Miami University
Alex C. Lange, University of Iowa

Religiously Unaffiliated College Students in the US: Characteristics, Experiences, and Outcomes
1:30-2:45pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Fourth, Salon H
This chapter provides an overview of college students in the United States who do not identify with any religion or faith. This group is interesting given the simultaneous prevalence of religion in the U.S. and the (relative) secularity of most colleges and universities in the country. Approximately 30% of college students are religiously unaffiliated, which constitutes a remarkable increase from even a decade or two ago (Eagan et al., 2015, 2016). This group is quite heterogeneous, since about half of religiously unaffiliated young adults report believing in God, and about one-sixth report praying daily (Smith & Snell, 2009; also see Pew Research Center, 2015). This student population faces a unique set of challenges regarding campus climate; few campus organizations are designed for unaffiliated students, many atheist students describe attempts to hide or reveal their identity in similar ways as LGBTQ students (Mueller, 2012), and even interfaith dialogues may intentionally or unintentionally exclude the views and identities of religiously unaffiliated students (Nash, 2011). Finally, perhaps as a result of difficulties finding a lack of community, religiously unaffiliated students tend to fare worse than students who identify with Christianity and other religions on various outcomes, including mental well-being, physical health, college satisfaction, spirituality, and charitable involvement (Felix & Bowman, 2015). 
Nick Bowman, University of Iowa

The Unfolding of Student Adjustment during the First Semester of College
3:00-4:15pm, Marriott Marquis Houston, Third, Hunter's Creek B 
This study draws upon a unique dataset to explore week-by-week changes in college students’ sense of belonging and well-being during their first semester. The results indicate that belonging and well-being tend to improve over the course of the semester, and several college and non-college experiences consistently predict changes within students. 
Nick Bowman, University of Iowa
Nayoung Jang, University of Iowa
Lindsay Jarrett, University of Iowa
Tim Bono, Washington University in St. Louis