Ph.D. Curriculum

Ph.D. Curriculum Plan

Ph.D. Program Objectives

Program Prerequisites

Ph.D. Timeline

Comprehensive Examinations

Dissertation

Frequently Asked Questions

Practicum and Internships

Plan of Study

University Policies

Curriculum

Requirements

The Ph.D. in counselor education and supervision requires 96 s.h. of graduate credit. Students complete required courses in counseling and in research tools and applications, an optional emphasis area, and a minor outside the department. They also take comprehensive examinations and complete a dissertation.

Most students complete their course work in three years and take a fourth year to complete the dissertation. Students who have not completed a master's degree program approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) may need to remedy deficiencies by taking appropriate master's-level course work.

Required Courses

RCE:7255 Advanced Career Development and Counseling (or equivalent)   3 s.h.
RCE:7347 Home/School/Community: System Interventions   3 s.h.
RCE:7353 Advanced Counseling and Psychotherapy   3 s.h.
RCE:7257 Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy   3 s.h.
RCE:7360 Advanced Practicum in Counseling (section 002)   3 s.h.
RCE:7380 Practicum in College Teaching   3 s.h.
RCE:7385 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education   3 s.h.
RCE:7400 Seminar: Ethics and Issues in Counseling   3 s.h.
RCE:7451 Advanced Multiculturalism   3 s.h.
RCE:7454 Supervision Theory and Practice   3 s.h.
RCE:7455 Supervising the Counseling Practicum   3 s.h.
RCE:7457 Seminar: Professional Orientation to Counselor Education and Supervision   3 s.h.
RCE:7458 Seminar: Current Issues and Trends in Counselor Education and Supervision   3 s.h.
RCE:7459 Seminar: Leadership and Advocacy in Counselor Education and Supervision   3 s.h.
RCE:7465 Internship in Counselor Education (at least 240 hours)   3 s.h.
RCE:7448 Integrated Developmental Theory and Counseling   3 s.h.
At least one advanced course in psychological or educational measurement   3 s.h.

Research Tools and Applications

Students are expected to master research tools and applications beyond the minimum requirements in order to develop research skills consistent with their professional goals. RCE Doctoral Research Requirements.

Elective Minor Area

Students may elect to take a series of courses (typically a minimum of three) in an area of study outside the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education. They select course work in collaboration with their minor area advisor, a faculty member from the area, and with approval of the curriculum plan committee.

Empirical Research (ER) Experience Project --Quantitative, Qualitative, or Mixed Methods

Students must complete an empirical research (ER) experience project prior to applying for comprehensive examinations. Effective Summer 2009, the CES faculty have unanimously agreed to remove the M.E. requirement in favor of an organized empirical research experience.  There are two options for incoming CES PhD students to meet this experiential research requirement.  Students currently in the program may choose the new requirement in place of the traditional M.E.

Experiential Research (ER) requirement must follow this process:

  • Students must produce a faculty approved data-driven IRB submission.

  1. Research must be conducted, data gathered, and analyzed.

  2. An empirical (qualitative/quantitative/mixed methods) research report/article must be written.

  3. This article must be submitted for publication to a peer-refereed journal.

  4. Faculty mentors supervising the project will evaluate satisfactory/unsatisfactory participation and completion of these objectives. Progress associated with the experiential research project will be assessed by the CES Faculty at the PhD Annual Reviews.

This ER requirement may be met through the following options:

Option 1: Research Team participation under the direction of a Faculty Team Leader.  (3 s.h.)  Research teams will be formed by the faculty mentors each fall for a period of one academic year. First and second year doctoral students should only be involved with one research team at a time. Faculty team leaders will be the director and first author on all research team projects.  Research team member order of authorship will be determined depending on a written agreement made at the beginning of the research team relationship (CES Faculty will encourage random authorship for team members).

Option 2: Faculty/PhD Student Research Practicum (3 s.h.)  Students are encouraged to seek out a faculty research mentor to work on a particular research project leading to publication. Faculty mentors may be first or second authors depending on a written agreement made at  the beginning of the research relationship.

Transitional ME: Doctoral student enrolled in the program prior to Fall 2010 may choose to complete a 5 chapter, traditional M.E. under their faculty advisor’s mentorship.

Agreed upon rules.  Any doctoral student may, at faculty discretion and with due process, be removed from the research team or faculty/student research relationship due to a lack of performance, or inability to participate in the research project.  The student may choose to join another research team. Faculty mentors may choose to invoke the RCE Review and Retention policy if necessary.

Students should enroll in RCE:6394 Research and Scholarship Internship- using appropriate credit hours per advisor recommendations to meet this requirement.

Comprehensive Exam

Beginning in fall 2012, doctoral students in the Counselor Education & Supervision Program will be utilizing the portfolio as the method of comprehensive examination.  The Counselor Education & Supervision doctoral e-portfolio evaluation process was designed to function as a final measure of student readiness prior to the development of a dissertation. It is to be completed during (or following) the final semester of regular courses. This portfolio will serve as doctoral student’s final comprehensive examination. Students are expected to work closely with their advisors to identify appropriate artifacts for the required sections of the portfolio. The required sections explore competencies expected of today’s counselor educators. These primary competency categories were selected by the faculty to track students’ developmental progress throughout the program across several outcome domains. Students should see their CES advisor for a copy of the Competency areas and required artifacts.

Dissertation

The major research project culminating in the doctoral thesis may be on any topic related to counseling and counselor education. The thesis advisor and the examining committee approve the topic and procedures at a formal prospectus meeting. The final oral examination on the thesis is conducted by the examining committee. Students usually earn 10 s.h. for dissertation work, but in some instances they may earn up to 15 s.h.

Curriculum Plan

The curriculum plan is a framework of courses and experiences that a student must complete in order to graduate with the Ph.D. degree in Counselor Education. The curriculum plan will consist of a list of all courses to be considered for approval as part of the 96 s.h. requirement for the Ph.D. degree. This will include all master’s level courses already completed as well as anticipated doctoral-level courses and expected dates of completion. In addition, the curriculum plan must include a statement of professional and career goals. The curriculum plan must be approved by the major advisor, minor area advisor, and two (2) faculty in RCE. Revisions to the curriculum plan may be made with committee approval. If a RCE core requirement is to be waived, a Division Waiver form (available in N338) must be completed and signed by the advisor and Division Chair. PDF iconCES PhD Curriculum plan

Program Objectives

The Counselor Education Ph.D. objectives address the professional leadership roles of counselor education, supervision, advanced counseling practice, and research competencies expected of doctoral graduates.

The program consists of a minimum of four academic years of graduate level preparation (including entry-level preparation), defined as eight semesters, with a minimum of 96 graduate-level credits required of all students in the program. (See Ph.D. Plan of Study)

Learning experiences beyond the entry-level are required in all of the following content areas:

  • theories pertaining to the principles and practice of counseling, career development, group work, systems, and consultation
  • theories and practices of counselor supervision
  • instructional theory and methods relevant to counselor education
  • pedagogy relevant to current social and cultural issues, including social change theory and advocacy action planning
  • design and implementation of quantitative research and methodology, including univariate, multivariate, and single-subject design
  • design and implementation of qualitative research, including grounded theory, ethnographic, and phenomenological methodologies
  • models and methods of assessment and use of data
  • ethical and legal considerations in counselor education and supervision
  • the role of racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status, family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs, occupation, physical and mental status, local, regional, national, international perspective, and equity issues in counselor education programs

Counselor Education Ph.D. students will have experiences that are designed to:

  • develop an area of professional counseling expertise
  • develop collaborative relationships with program faculty in teaching, supervision, research, professional writing, and service to the profession and the public
  • foster participation in professional counseling organizations, including the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) and the American Counseling Association (ACA)
  • meet criteria for appropriate credentials
  • promote scholarly counseling research
  • enhance technical competence

Upon completion of an academic program in RCE, students will be evaluated and expected to have awareness, knowledge, and skills in the following areas:

  • current definitions, professional standards, and appropriate professional practices regarding multiculturalism
  • what it means to be a multiculturally competent helping professional
  • integrated feedback into practice and professionalism in interpersonal interactions
  • personal limitations and strengths (that could ultimately support or harm a client/student)
  • a personal plan for future practice in the field regarding multicultural relationships. 

Program Prerequisites

1. Relevant post-master’s experience.

Because the program is designed for individuals who will assume responsibility in supervising or training counselors, experience provides the foundation for further professional development.  A minimum of one year (but preferably two years) of professional counseling or related experiences is required for admission.  Applicants who have significant counseling experience prior to receiving their master’s degree but who do not have experience post-master’s should contact the program chair to discuss this.

2.Related master’s degree.

Applicants should possess a master’s degree in counseling or a related field containing at least the following courses or their equivalents:

  • Professional Identity
  • Social and Cultural Diversity
  • Human Growth and Development
  • Career Development
  • Helping Relationships
  • Group Work
  • Assessment
  • Research and Program Evaluation
  • Counseling experiences in the form of supervised practicum and internship.

A deficiency in one or more of the above course content areas must be completed and may not be used to fulfill any of the doctoral degree requirements listed below.

The Graduate College will acknowledge an unlimited amount of credit hours from the master’s degree toward the doctoral program, as long as the Counselor Education faculty believe the hours to be relevant.

Timeline

Curriculum Plan: Must be completed by the end of the first year.

Master’s Equivalency Research Project (if necessary): Must be completed prior to comprehensive exams and within 24 months or 30 s.h., whichever benefits the student. Restrictions will be placed on continuing enrollment should a student fail to complete the ME within the designated time frame.

Comprehensive Examinations: Beginning in fall 2012, doctoral students in the Counselor Education & Supervision Program will be utilizing the portfolio as the method of comprehensive examination. The Counselor Education & Supervision doctoral e-portfolio evaluation process was designed to function as a final measure of student readiness prior to the development of a dissertation. It is to be completed during (or following) the final semester of regular courses. This portfolio will serve as doctoral student’s final comprehensive examination. Students are expected to work closely with their advisors to identify appropriate artifacts for the required sections of the portfolio. The required sections explore competencies expected of today’s counselor educators. These primary competency categories were selected by the faculty to track students’ developmental progress throughout the program across several outcome domains. Students should see their CES advisor for a copy of the Competency areas and required artifacts.

Dissertation Prospectus: A prospectus meeting may only be scheduled after the successful completion of comprehensive exams.

Annual Review of Ph.D. Students: To be completed by Counselor Education faculty at the end of each spring semester.

Comprehensive Examinations

Beginning in fall 2012, doctoral students in the Counselor Education & Supervision Program will be utilizing the portfolio as the method of comprehensive examination+.  The Counselor Education and Supervision doctoral e-portfolio evaluation process was designed to function as a final measure of student readiness prior to the development of a dissertation. It is to be completed during (or following) the final semester of regular courses. This portfolio will serve as doctoral student’s final comprehensive examination. Students are expected to work closely with their advisors to identify appropriate artifacts for the required sections of the portfolio. The required sections explore competencies expected of today’s counselor educators. These primary competency categories were selected by the faculty to track students’ developmental progress throughout the program across several outcome domains.

When the advisor is satisfied that sufficient evidence has been provided for all of the required competency subsections, the student will select a committee of faculty portfolio reviewers (in consultation with the advisor++). Rules for the selection of committee members will be consistent with traditional comprehensive exam committee structures (major advisor, minor advisor, 2 department faculty and one other graduate faculty member(s)). The committee’s purpose will be to a) meet and discuss the quality of the artifacts provided, b) discuss and ask questions regarding the content of the portfolio with the student, and c) to make a determination of the student’s readiness to proceed to dissertation.

All students are required to submit appropriate application forms required by the College of Education for the comprehensive exam and application for graduation (audit) by the college deadlines and prior to the committee meeting. After these forms are successfully submitted, students will coordinate and arrange a meeting time for the committee. Committee members should be given at least two weeks to review the online portfolio materials before the review meeting is held.

The portfolio will be constructed online using the e-portfolio system. Students must demonstrate a product for those categories marked * and provide documentation for each primary competency category (professional identity, teaching, research, service, advanced practitioner, and supervision). Entries for the final two categories (awards & supplemental) will be completed as necessary in consultation with the student’s advisor.

Students should consider how the products of each year’s course work and other activities can be integrated into the portfolio. That being said, at the time the portfolio is released for comprehensive examination, all products displayed must be in their final format. No working documents should be displayed. Students can consult with faculty at end-of-the-year reviews if they have questions.

Students may display their portfolio in different ways including the following: utilizing the University of Iowa e-portfolio system, dropbox.com, flash drives or burned CDs to each committee member, or MS Word documents with embedded links.  Students should consult with their CES advisor about their plan to disseminate the portfolio.

Please see your CES advisor for a copy of the Competency areas and required artifacts. 

 + Students who enrolled in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 have the option of the traditional written and oral exams or the portfolio.

 ++Some minor areas (ex: Applied Statistics) may require a traditional 3 hour exam in lieu of the paper. Students should consult with their CES advisor and minor advisor to ensure clarity for this assignment.

Minor Area Comprehensive Exam

Ph.D students should consult with their minor area advisors regarding how to prepare for the minor area examination.

Dissertation

When the Ph.D. candidate and committee chair have agreed upon the general area of dissertation research, committee membership will be reviewed and, if necessary, revised so that the most appropriate committee chair and committee members will be available to the student through the stages of designing and conducting the research, analyzing the data, and writing the dissertation.

Prospectus

When the student and committee chair have agreed upon a potential dissertation topic, the student must have a prospectus meeting to obtain the entire committees’ approval before the research is carried out. The prospectus meeting should be scheduled by the student only after receiving approval to do so from the student’s committee chair.  The student is responsible for completing all Institutional Review Board forms for the research proposal and for arranging and scheduling the prospectus meeting so that all members of the committee can be present.  The student-prepared written prospectus (consisting of cover page, table of contents, chapters 1-3, references, and appendices) should be given to the committee members at least two weeks before the meeting.

Oral Defense

When the student has completed writing the dissertation and has made revisions to the satisfaction of the committee chair, the final oral defense of the dissertation should be scheduled. The student should expect to go through and revise several drafts of the dissertation with the committee chair. The committee chair is expected to ensure that the dissertation is in near final form before allowing the meeting to be scheduled.  The student is responsible for arranging and scheduling a time (2 hours) so that all members of the committee can be present. The student must give each committee member a copy of the complete dissertation at least two weeks in advance of the meeting.  Students should not expect this to be the final typed version for the Graduate College, as there are typically sufficient revisions after the final oral to necessitate some retyping.

Final Copy of Dissertation

After the final revisions are made, the dissertation must be typed according to the specific requirements of the Graduate College as outlined in the Thesis Manual.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Can I apply for this program with a Master's Degree in another area of study?
    Yes, you may apply to the PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision with a MA degree from another area.  Each applicant file is considered based upon the candidates merit for success as a future researcher and Counselor Educator.  Your transcript would be evaluated by an advisor to determine if you need to take MA Counseling classes to build a stronger foundation for the PhD courses. Sometimes these remedial requirements are so close to obtaining another Master's Degree that students choose to do this first.
  2. Do my Master's Degree semester hours count toward the PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision?
    If you Master's Degree in counseling is from an accredited college or university it is most likely your hours will transfer and be counted toward the PhD.  If you hold a MA from a CACREP accredited program the hours will transfer.

Practicum and Internships

Counselor Education Ph.D. students are required to complete three doctoral-level clinical experiences, an Internship (320 clock hours) in counseling, a practicum in supervision (160 clock hours), and a practicum in teaching (120 clock hours), totaling a minimum of 600 clock hours. Students are responsible for documenting their clinical experiences and internship hours.

Students must receive weekly individual or triadic supervision from a supervisor with a doctorate in counselor education or a related profession. They must also participate in regularly scheduled group supervision with other practicum and internship students. Group supervision will be provided by Counselor Education Program faculty.

Specific arrangements of the internship (hours, duties, supervision) must be worked out between the student, the setting, and the student’s advisor. The Counselor Education Program faculty will grant final approval.

Internship in Counseling consists of a minimum of 320 hours and will involve the student performing most of the activities of a regularly employed professional in the chosen setting. Students may choose to complete this internship over one or two semester within the following guidelines:

  • 1 semester option (register for 3 s.h.): 320 hours over 16 weeks (20 hours per week) including direct client contact, indirect contact, and supervision.
  • 2 semester option (register for and additional 3 s.h.): for each semester - 160 hours over 16 weeks (11 hours per week) including direct client contact, indirect contact, and supervision.

Practicum in Teaching consists of a minimum of 120 hours accumulated through teaching or co-teaching experiences. Hours spent as a teaching assistant will not count towards the practicum in teaching. Hours can be accumulated for time spent teaching, preparing for lectures, grading assignments, meeting with students, and in supervision. The practicum in teaching arrangements are made between the student, the potential faculty for the class, and the student's faculty advisor. The CES program faculty ahve the final approval.

Practicum in Supervision consists of a minimum of 160 hours accumulated through supervision experiences. These experiences can include conducting individual or group supervision sessions, reviewing tapes, and supervision of supervision. Typically, CES students collaborate with Faculty who teach 07C:278 Applied Microcounseling, 07C:202 Introduction to Groups, 07C:300 Practicum in School Counseling, 07C:321/322 Internship in School Counseling or Clinical Rehabiliation classes. 

Our Ph.D. Promise

 

Plan of Study

RCE:7255 Advanced Career Development & Counseling (3)
RCE:7353 Advanced Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)
RCE:7257 Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)
RCE:7400 Professional Seminar and Ethics in Counselor Ed. (3)
RCE:7451 Advanced Multicultural Class (3)
Choice Advanced Course in Human Development (3)
Choice Advanced Course in Psychological or Educational Measurement such as PSQF:7310, PSQF:6312, PSQF:7315, or RCE:5248 (3)
RCE:7347 Home/School/Community: Systems Interventions (3)
RCE:7454 Counselor Supervision, Theory and Practice (3)
PSQF:6243 Intermediate Statistical Methods (4)
Choice Quantitative research course beyond PSQF:6243 (3) Course must be selected from the following list: PSQF:6244, PSQF:6245, PSQF:6246, PSQF:6252, or EPLS:6370
RCE:7338 Qualitative research (3)
EPLS:6206 Research Process & Design (or equivalent) (3)
RCE:7457 Seminar Professional Orientation to CES (3)
RCE:7458 Seminar Current Issues & Trends in CES (3)
RCE:7459 Seminar Leadership & Advocacy in CES (3)
RCE:7460 Seminar Research in Counseling (3)
RCE:7360 Advanced Counseling Practicum (3)
RCE:7465 Internship in Counselor Education (3)
RCE:7455 Supervising the Counseling Practicum (3)
PSQF:7385 Teaching and Learning in Higher Ed or Equivalent (3)
RCE:7380 Practicum in College Teaching (3)
RCE:6394 Master’s Equivalency Research in CNED (3)
RCE:7493 Ph.D. Thesis in Counselor Education (10-15)
Emphasis and/or Minor Area Emph

University Policies

Manual of Rules and Regulations

Students should be familiar with Graduate College policies regarding issues such as residency requirements, transfer of credits, assistantships, academic standing, etc. A complete list of rules and regulations is available at http://www.grad.uiowa.edu/graduate-college-manual

Policy on Student Academic Misconduct

Plagiarism or cheating may result in grade reduction and/or other serious penalties. Examples of plagiarizing or cheating include:

  • presenting someone else's written or spoken words or ideas as your own
  • using direct quotes with no quotation marks, paraphrasing without crediting the source or in some other way suggesting someone else's work is yours
  • copying all or part of someone else's exam, homework, etc.
  • knowingly allowing another student to copy your work or to submit your work as his/her own
  • misrepresenting your contribution in a group project
  • referring to notes, texts, etc. during a closed book exam
  • collaborating with others on a take home exam when directed not to do so

Faculty in the College of Education who detect cheating or plagiarism should consult with their division chair. If punitive action is going to be taken, it should be done in consultation with the Associate Dean of Student Services in the College of Education (N310LC, 335-5594). Punitive action may take the form of a reduction of points on the work involved, lowering a course grade, or more serious action.

Student Complaint Procedures

  • Discuss your concern with the person with whom you have the problem. Try to avoid an adversarial approach. Assume there is a misunderstanding, not intentional malice. The more you can resolve problems at an informal, personal level, the more effective we will be in the long run.
  • If the complaint is not resolved, or the issue is of such a personal nature or retribution is feared, then you should discuss the situation with the division chair (current office addresses for division chairs are listed in the Schedule of Courses at the head of the section where the course is listed or on the College of Education's Home Page on the World Wide Web).
  • If your instructor is a teaching assistant, see the supervising faculty member whose name and office number are provided to you at the beginning of the semester before going to the division office.
  • If the complaint is not resolved at the division level, it should be addressed to the Associate Dean for Student Services (N310LC, 335-5594).
  • If you feel a satisfactory resolution has not been reached with the Associate Dean for Student Services, a written appeal should be filed with the Office of the Dean (N459LC). This appeal should outline the issues in dispute and the remedies requested and should describe the steps already taken in accordance with the procedures set forth above.
  • The Dean may convene a special advisory committee to recommend appropriate action. The Dean may affirm, overrule, or modify the committee's recommendations.
  • The Office of the University Ombudsperson (C108 Seashore Hall, 335-3608) responds to problems and disputes brought forward by all members of the University community-students, staff, and faculty. The ombudsperson may be consulted at any time.
  • If the complaint cannot be resolved through these procedures, a student may file a formal complaint with the University under the procedures established for alleged violations of the statement on "Professional Ethics and Academic Responsibility" (see Part III, Chapter 15) in the University Operations Manual. Copies of the University Operations Manual are available in all division offices and in the Office of Student Services, N310LC.

Notes about specific types of complaints:

Instruction and Course Requirements. It is important that concerns about use of class time, use of inappropriate content, inequities in assignments, lack of academic feedback, lack of accommodations for students with disabilities. incompetence in oral communication, etc. be shared with the instructor as soon as it is perceived that the problem is a critical or recurring one. Postponing this action will often increase the seriousness of the problem and decrease the likelihood a satisfactory accommodation can be made before the end of the course.

Student Disabilities. It is expected that students with disabilities will let faculty know what accommodations are needed. If after doing so, and problems still exist, students should follow the general procedures outlined above. If the procedures as outlined do not satisfactorily resolve a problem related to an identified disability, students should exercise their right to file a complaint with the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office (202 Jessup Hall, 335-0705).

Grade Disputes. In most educational settings, the instructor exercises considerable professional judgment. However, arbitrary or inappropriate grading practices need to be identified and remedied. Students should follow the general complaint procedures outlined above.

Sexual Harassment. If a complaint involves sexual harassment, you should follow University procedures rather than the complaint procedures outlined above. The University policy on sexual harassment and consensual relationships in the instructional context can be found in "Policies and Regulations Affecting Students (available at the Campus Information Center, Iowa Memorial Union, in the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office [202 Jessup Hall, 335-0705] and in The Daily Iowan in the month of September as a supplement). Sexual harassment complaints may be filed with the Office of Affirmative Action.